National Walnut Day

May 17 is #NationalWalnutDay. What could be more appropriate than a snippet from Sees Behind Trees by Michael Dorris, the story of a Native American boy named Walnut, who is extremely near-sighted.

“Walnut.” My name in my mother’s mouth was tired, pounded into flour. “You know the rule: you must find the target before breakfast can find you.”

I nodded. If that was the rule, I wouldn’t eat for a long time. We had faced this matter of what I couldn’t see many times before—when my mother would point to something I couldn’t locate or throw a ball I couldn’t catch—but it had never before been such serious business. Now we couldn’t just act as though nothing was wrong. Now we had to solve the problem.

Unless Walnut can hit a target with his bow and arrow, he won’t be able to prove he’s a man and earn a man’s name. But with the help of his mother and the wisdom of the elders, he earns the name Sees Behind Trees. #ComingOfAge #NativeAmerican #JourneyTale #MGFavorite

Dorris, Michael - Sees Behind Trees

CJ’s review on Goodreads >>

National Pack Rat Day

May 17 is National Pack Rat Day! If you are a collector of things, a hoarder of random objects, or loathe to throw anything out, you’re probably one of us. Do you recognize this famous fictional pack rat?

“Look,” he began in his sharp voice, “you say you have seven goslings. There were eight eggs. What happened to the other egg? Why didn’t it hatch?”

“It’s a dud, I guess,” said the goose.

“What are you going to do with it?” continued Templeton, his little round beady eyes fixed on the goose.

“You can have it,” replied the goose. “Roll it away and add it to that nasty collection of yours.” (Templeton had a habit of picking up unusual objects around the farm and storing them in his home. He saved everything.)

Charlotte’s Web by E. B. White

 

What do you collect?

 

National Name Yourself Day

The calendar is filled with notable days, some more quirky than others. April 9 is #NationalNameYourselfDay, and I actually have an appropriate middlegrade book quote. In Rebecca Stead’s Liar & Spy, we meet a boy named Georges.

My name is Georges, which is pronounced just like “George” because the S is silent, but of course some kids call me “Jor-Jess,” or “Gorgeous.” I don’t much care. There are worse things to be called than Gorgeous, even for a boy.

Liar and Spy

Of course, Georges didn’t name himself. But his new neighbors definitely fit in the quirky department. They’re not exactly conventional, and all three kids really did name themselves. Continue reading “National Name Yourself Day”